Hashtags To Reach Parents On Social Media

The online realm has made conversation more instant than ever, and as it had all other things, it has also transformed parenting. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of parents who actively use social media agree that they get useful information from their networks, including 32% who “strongly agree”. According to Pew Research Center surveys, “two-in-five parents who use social media say they got support from their networks for parenting issues over the past month, and mothers who use social media are nearly twice as likely as fathers to say they get support.” More than half (59%) of parents who are social media users said they had come across useful information about parenting while looking at social media content. 7% say this happens “frequently,” while 26% say this occurs “sometimes” and only 26% “hardly ever.”

 

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For parents who find themselves texting with one hand while juggling the diaper bag, coffee, or keys in the other, hashtags can be a quick way to search for information. This of course creates opportunities for marketers who need to reach parents with their message. To make it easier for you, we’ve rounded up a few of the best parenting hashtags you need to know if you’re interested in this market:

1. #KidsHealth

Among many parenting hashtags, #kidshealth seems to be one of the most useful, as their kids health is always at the top of the mind of parents. In the past few days, this hashtag got an average of 118 tweets per day. We think this is a perfect opportunity to reach the parents market – the hashtag is popular enough to generate a few blog posts across the Internet, but isn’t too popular that your tweets might go unnoticed if you get in on the hashtag.

While it hasn’t yet gone mainstream, you can definitely hop in on the hashtag and take advantage of it.

2. #WhatsForDinner

Although this hashtag is admittedly non-exclusive to parents, it is very much used by this special category of chefs. After cooking meals day after day, sometimes you just can’t seem to figure out what to cook for dinner. For brands which want to reach parents with messages related to nutrition, this can be a very useful venue that goes beyond the most obvious choices.

3. #RaisingAGenius (or #raisingagenius)

All parents are proud of their own kids. #RaisingAGenius is a hashtag used by parents across the globe to show off their children’s advanced skills. Whether doing a clever trick or painting a Van Gogh-looking masterpiece, you’ll find different things kids do that are advanced for their age.

 

4. #ParentWin

The #ParentWin hashtag is where parents share their parenting wins online. Some examples are successful potty training, getting their kids to eat broccoli, and teaching toddlers a new word. This is a great avenue for brands to butt in and celebrate the success with the parents.

5. #MumQuotes

They say motherhood opens you up to another language. We can’t blame moms – being an adult for years and having to explain the world to a child with a very little vocabulary is no easy feat. #MumQuotes rounds up some of the funniest (and occasionally wise) things moms say.

Social media is a helpful tool for parenting, and that’s why we’re going to see more and more parents use it to find useful suggestions. As more people learn to use hashtags to search what they look for, we expect these to become an even better marketing tool for those who want to reach parents on social media.

Sources:
http://mums.bodyandsoul.com.au/pregnancy+parenting/parenting+tips/10+hashtags+all+parents+need+to+know,30375
http://redtri.com/followthesefeeds-5-cool-parenting-hashtags-to-follow/#
http://www.buzzfeed.com/mikespohr/brutally-honest-parenting-hashtags#.kqQV60YZ5
http://www.madeformums.com/school-and-family/best-parenting-hashtags-of-2014/36417.html
http://www.onlinecollegecourses.com/2011/01/31/70-super-useful-twitter-hashtags-for-homeschoolers/

How To Get Results Even With Overused Hashtags

On social media, there are thousands of overused hashtags. As we explained in our free guide on using hashtags for marketing, the best ones for you are most likely those which are popular enough but not too popular, and specific to your niche.

However, even the most overused tags can be used in creative and meaningful ways. To show you what we mean, we picked out a couple of the most abused of the overused hashtags, #Selfie and #FoodPorn, and looked for creative examples that could inspire your next campaign.

#Selfie

This hashtag doesn’t need an introduction, does it? We observed it on Twitter for just 3 days (10/11-10/14) and here’s what we found:

Selfie Hashtag Summary 10/11-10/14

That’s a whopping 195,952,576 face impressions in 3 days! There’s gotta be some worth in that, right? Well, our team thinks so, so we went full-on social media geek for you and scoured the Internet for ways your brand can tap into this overworked hashtag (you’re welcome!).

The real genius behind the selfie evolution is how it plays to Gen Y’s narcissistic culture. How can we use this?

a)  Defy conventions

In a world where Photoshop reigns supreme and Kim Kardashian is altering her own bum on Instagram, Dove decided to encourage women to turn this idea of the selfie on its head, publishing pictures that highlight their most disliked feature.

This is exactly what mother and daughter duos do in the short film Dove used to kickstart the campaign, appropriately titled “Selfie” and first presented at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival.

Dove’s own research revealed that 63% of women believe social media is influencing today’s definition of beauty more than print, film, or music. This data contributed to inspire their target market to participate actively and use the campaign’s own hashtag, #BeautyIs, together with the already famous  #selfie, to “help young women redefine what beauty is”.

“The Challenge. Take an Honest Selfie. No Filters. No Edits.”

 

 

It’s no wonder that the video went viral and its two versions reached a total of almost 7 million views. Going against the grain of a big hashtag worked well for Dove, and in the process it also helped the larger movement to empower women to redefine the traditional perception of beauty using the selfie.

b)  Use the power of irony

Can you create a very ironic and surprising selfie about your product? This can really get attention. Take the cue from Star Wars’ Instagram account:

#Selfie #StarWars #DarthVader

c)  Contests

This is a well known option, but we couldn’t skip it. Contests are a very powerful way to get people to participate in your campaign and get more word-of-mouth advertising, like the one  Kenneth Cole that ran from January 31 to March 31, 2014.

Keneth Cole Contest

Here, people had to follow the official account and use the #DressForYourSelfie hashtag to join the contest, together with #selfie. Attaching to an existing and very relevant hashtag, the contest was able to gain a higher visibility, faster.

#Foodporn

With over 220 million impressions from 89,224 tweets in a week, #FoodPorn is still as widely used (if not more) today than on its debut a few years back. 90 photos are uploaded with the Instagram hashtag #foodporn every single minute.

FoodPorn Hashtag Summary

Even if this hashtag is mostly used by food blogs and average social media Joes to share pictures of food that want to make you cry and say sorry to your diet, it is possible to use it creatively.

a)  Turn it into a social cause

Nothing encourages goodwill better than social causes. People love knowing they can contribute to society, so when you encourage your audience to do something for the greater good, it resonates more than a completely self-serving suggestion.

Hijacking the #foodporn feed, #MealforAMeal is how Virgin Mobile together with OzHarvest kickstarted their campaign to turn the contemporary #foodporn obsession  into a social cause.

Virgin Mobile Image

So far, there have been 300,396 posts that have been turned into a meal by Virgin Mobile. Find out more about this campaign here: http://www.makingmobilebetter.com.au/meal-for-a-meal

b)  Use a great call-to-action

Even when a hashtag is overused, and it’s very difficult to do something people will notice among all those posts, a good way to differentiate yourself is by using a powerful and relevant call to action, like in these two examples:

 

It’s like passing along leaflets in a very crowded street – even if you’ll be seen by only a small percentage of passers by, at least with those you have a good chance to make an impact.

c)  Make it a series

Reynolds, a popular foil brand aimed to piggyback on the #foodporn hashtag by creating a series of recipe posts. Reynolds knew their target market are into food, so they developed a simple idea that would allow them to post consistently and on-topic using this hashtag. Drip by drip, this a good way to find a bigger audience even amid an ocean of other posts – but it requires patience and dedication.

Food Series

In conclusion, even overused hashtags can help your marketing campaign. It’s just a matter of creativity and knowing how to position your brand in that context. We hope we helped you get some inspiration. Happy hashtagging!

#HeForShe: How much does the Internet remember?

Can a social media marketing campaign have a long-term impact on important topics? This is exactly what UN Women tried to achieve with their #HeForShe effort, launched on last year’s International Women’s day to attack yet another time the very serious and long-standing issue of sexism. We want to analyze what’s left of this big campaign one year and a half later.

Even if the official launch was on 8 March 2014, the big splash was only achieved on September 20th, a full six months later. And this splash came when Emma Watson became the face of the movement, thanks to a momentous speech at the UN general assembly.

The big splash moment

Who could ignore Hermione Granger’s highly televised “formal invitation” to men to stand up for the rights of women – which was the central message of the campaign? Generation Y, the major demographic of social media users, also known as the millennial generation, basically grew up with Watson so we could see why she was the perfect face for the movement.

Before Watson’s appeal, the campaign tweets count was in the tens of thousands. But, just two weeks after her presentation, the hashtag #HeForShe had generated 1.1 million tweets from 750,000 different users, with a potential reach of over a hundred of millions people on Twitter alone.

In the social media flurry that followed, there were a lot of celebrities that helped in on the campaign. Here’s a refresher:

 

 

 

Even Twitter itself participated in the stand against gender discrimination, painting the hashtag inside their HQ in San Francisco, California.

 

There was also the incredibly supportive compliment from Tom Hiddleston, everyone’s favorite Avenger-nemesis, Thor’s brother. This tweet was so popular it even headlined several articles on the Internet, including Buzzfeed’s.

Now this account doesn’t technically fall into the “celebrity”category, but if we’re talking influential, you have to give @WhiteHouse some credit.

 

But, after such a big boost, how much does the Internet remember today? Did the message get through enough to still be relevant?

Exactly one year after Emma Watson’s speech last year, as expected, the Twitter activity is much lower. But it’s still surprisingly high; and the anniversary itself brought a notable bump, as you can see in the chart below.

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(Twitter data for 9/10-9/24 2015)

 

If you haven’t guessed it yet, the main reason for that bump was a tweet by Emma Watson herself on the 15th. But that was actually a retweet of a message from the official account for the campaign, @HeForShe:

https://twitter.com/HeforShe/status/643769009180176384

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As you can imagine, even a single tweet on target (using the hashtag) from a celebrity with more than 19 million Twitter followers creates a big impact:

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(Twitter data for 9/10-9/24 2015)

 

In the chart above, computed for the period between Sept. 10 to Sept. 24, you can see that Watson’s retweet was itself retweeted 1,045 times, and she was mentioned 2,988 times together with the #HeForShe hashtag – a demonstration of just how big an influencer she still is in this campaign. This explains why, as you can see from the chart below, taken from our Hashtags Lab analysis, she is the second top influencer, only after @HeForShe:

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Prior to the day of the anniversary, between September 15th and 19th, there were 5709 total original tweets (not counting retweets).

As usual, the catalyzer of the activity was @HeForShe. For example, on the 16th, there were 681 total tweets, and the top one yet another retweet of by @caitlinwithac of one of the official campaign’s account messages:

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https://twitter.com/HeforShe/status/643802338809933824

On the day of the speech’s anniversary itself last 9/20 there were 1532 total tweets, a good recovery from the decline in the day prior. Have you guessed who the top tweet was from?

It’s not Emma, not @HeForShe, but @EmWatsonUpdates – a fan made account for updates and events in Emma Watson’s career. We almost wish we were as popular as miss Watson so someone else can do the tweeting for us when we forget to do it on an important day!

Now after the day has gone and the dust has settled, who else is tweeting about #HeForShe?

Let’s look at the data for 9/21. We found that there were 1136 total tweets, the top one, again by @HeForShe, in an attempt to piggyback on #Dubsmash and asking users to create videos of their favorite parts of Emma Watson’s speech.

 

As expected, there was a gradual drop in tweets in the days that followed, with both days owing their top tweets to @UN_Women:

https://twitter.com/UN_Women/status/646040013390659584\

https://twitter.com/UN_Women/status/646350552444628992

And this is exactly the point we wanted to get to. Having a big testimonial like Emma Watson – and her friends – is great, but the real long-term impact wouldn’t have been possible without the constant effort of the #HeForShe social media team, mainly channelled through their dedicated, homonymous @HeForShe account. These are their stats for 9/15 to 9/23:

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As you can see, it’s them who are doing the hard work and promoting the movement all year round. Even for the anniversary, it was @HeForShe that originally sent out the tweet that @emwatson retweeted last week; and that’s why our Hashtags Lab shows that account as the top Influencer for the hashtag, even if they only have 258,454 followers – much less than the celebrities who are constantly helping them.

Campaign Success – One Year Later

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In the end, in the two weeks we analyzed between September 10 and 24, 2015, there were a total of 12,051 tweets by 8,761 unique users. That’s about 1% of the total garnered tweets from last year, but it means that in just two weeks the campaign still generated 59 million potential unique impressions. And, just as importantly, there are lots of men using the hashtag as we have observed above, which is the main purpose of the movement – to get men involved.

Conclusion

One obvious conclusion of this analysis is that having a great testimonial really helps – without Emma Watson’s UN speech, #HeForShe would probably have continued just as in the previous 6 months. Influencer marketing clearly works.

But the less obvious conclusion, interesting also for those social media managers who can’t get a big name testimonial to speak at the UN General Assembly, is that having a dedicated account for a campaign, constantly keeping the fire up under the kettle, can really make a big difference.

@HeForShe was able to do just that, constantly putting out great content and proactively engaging their target audience. This is a good reminder that if content is king, then consistency is certainly queen.